Drink drivers detected 15 minutes apart – Tamworth

Two men will face court after being detected high-range drink driving within 15 minutes of each other at Tamworth at the weekend.

About 7.40pm on Sunday (28 October 2018), police stopped a silver Mitsubishi Lancer sedan on Duri Road, South Tamworth.

The driver, a 21-year-old man and holder of a provisional licence, was arrested after a positive roadside breath test.

He returned an alleged subsequent breath analysis reading of 0.177 and was charged with High Range PCA.

The man’s licence was suspended and he is due to appear at Tamworth Local Court on 19 November 2018.

About 15 minutes later, police stopped the same car on Duri Road, South Tamworth, after it was observed driving with no taillights.

A different driver, also a 21-year-old man, was arrested after he returned a positive roadside breath test. He subsequently returned an alleged breath analysis reading of 0.162 at Tamworth Police Station.

Further checks revealed his provisional 2 licence was disqualified until October 2022.

He was charged with High Range PCA (second subsequent offence) and drive while disqualified.

The man was granted conditional bail and will appear at Tamworth Local Court on Monday 19 November 2018.

Officer charged – Specialist Command

A police officer has been suspended after being charged with alleged child sex offences.

The 43-year-old senior constable was arrested about 3:50pm yesterday (Thursday 25 October 2018), by detectives from the Professional Standards Command, assisted by the State Crime Command’s Child Abuse and Sex Crimes Squad.

He has been charged with aggravated act of indecency, two counts of aggravated indecent assault, attempt sexual intercourse with a child under 10, grooming child under 14 years for unlawful sexual activity, two counts of have sexual intercourse with a child 10-14, and peep or pry.

The charges relate to offences that allegedly occurred between 2007 to 2018.

The officer, who has been suspended from duties from a specialist command, has been refused bail to appear at Penrith Local Court today (Friday 26 October 2018).

The current matters before the court are not related to the officer’s employment.

Appeal to locate two escapees – Glen Innes

Police are appealing for public assistance to locate two prisoners who escaped from a minimum security correctional facility in the state’s Northern Tablelands.

Robert Riley, aged 49, and Wayne Porter, aged 32, were reported missing from the facility on the Gwydir Highway, near Glen Innes, about 4.30pm today (Friday 26 October 2018).

Mr Riley is described as being of Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander appearance, 165cm tall, with brown hair and brown eyes.

Mr Porter is described as being of Caucasian appearance, 177cm tall, with brown hair and brown eyes.

It’s believed the men are travelling on foot.

Police are warning members of the public not to approach the men, but to instead call Triple Zero (000) immediately.

LANDMARK CHILD PROTECTION REFORM TO ENSURE CHILDREN NO LONGER LANGUISH IN CARE

The NSW Government will introduce a landmark child protection Bill into parliament this week to streamline court processes for guardianship and open adoption to ensure a permanent home for every child within two years.

Amendments to the Children and Young Persons (Care and Protection) Act and the Adoption Act will also give parents and extended family members an opportunity to resolve child protection risks and avoid the removal of children from their families.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian said short-term court orders will mean children no longer spend years moving between homes in the out-of-home care system.

“We want all children to know that they have a loving and safe home for life,” Ms Berejiklian said.

“When it is no longer safe for a child to stay at home, we want them to have a permanent home as quickly as possible through guardianship or open adoption. These reforms will help speed up that process.”

The reforms follow a wide-ranging public consultation process led by the discussion paper, Shaping A Better Child Protection System, released in October 2017.

Minister for Family and Community Services Pru Goward said the landmark reforms pave the way for family networks to support parents struggling to care for their children.

“For the first time ever, we will legislate for families to be offered alternatives such as Family Group Conferencing, giving parents and extended family the opportunity to address child protection risks so that their children can stay safely at home,” Ms Goward said.

“We are also looking to make guardianship easier for families with parents that know they can no longer care for their children and want to ensure their children have safety and security with a loving member of their family.”

ANZAC MEMORIAL UNVEILED BY THE DUKE OF SUSSEX

Sydney’s Anzac Memorial Centenary extension has been unveiled by His Royal Highness The Duke of Sussex.

The reopening of the Anzac Memorial by The Duke of Sussex celebrates the completion of the Centenary project, honouring NSW’s military legacy.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian said the $40 million upgrade, funded by the NSW and Federal Governments, was the centrepiece of the State’s Centenary of Anzac commemorations, marking the 100th anniversary of the ending of World War I.

“It is fitting the memorial is reopened today by the Duke of Sussex who is in Sydney for the Invictus Games, highlighting the significant role sport has played in the rehabilitation of veterans,” Ms Berejiklian said.

The Opening Ceremony for the Invictus Games Sydney 2018 is being held tonight at the Opera House, attended by Ms Berejiklian and Games competitors.

NSW Minister for Veterans Affairs David Elliott said the memorial, first opened in 1934, was an enduring legacy acknowledging more than a century of service.

“The Centenary Extension ensures the public have a place of contemplation, remembrance, education and reflection. The project realises the vision of the original architect, Bruce Dellit, with the completion of the water cascade to the south,” Mr Elliott said.

A walkway through the cascade allows memorial visitors to enter the new Hall of Service, exhibition galleries and education facilities, providing a contemporary understanding of the history and impact of conflict.

The Hall of Service, featuring a moving artwork by Fiona Hall, pays tribute to those across NSW who served in the Great War with 1,701 locations acknowledged. The ongoing service and sacrifice over more than a century is also commemorated with 100 sites of significance to NSW military history recorded in a ring on the floor.

The Anzac Memorial Centenary Extension officially opens to the public on Remembrance Day.

NSW GOVERNMENT DELIVERS APOLOGY TO SURVIVORS OF INSTITUTIONAL CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE

Premier Gladys Berejiklian has delivered an apology to survivors of institutional child sexual abuse on behalf of the NSW Government at an official ceremony at the Sydney Opera House this morning.

The apology paid tribute to survivors, and thanked those who bravely shared their experiences through the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

“On behalf of the Government and people of NSW, to every survivor, I apologise deeply and unreservedly – for the pain they have suffered, and for the failure of governments and institutions to protect them when they needed it most,” Ms Berejiklian said.

“It is my responsibility to ensure that we act today where governments and institutions too often failed in the past – beginning with the adoption and implementation of the Royal Commission’s recommendations.

“We will use every authority of Government to create meaningful, enduring change in the institutions and organisations of our society.”

Attorney General Mark Speakman said today’s apology recognises the widespread impact of child sexual abuse revealed by the Royal Commission.

“The NSW Government has responded with comprehensive reforms to the civil and criminal law, helping victims and survivors obtain access to justice and improving child safety, as well as being the first state or territory to legislate for redress,” Mr Speakman said.

Minister for Family and Community Services Pru Goward said the NSW Government was taking action to prevent child sexual abuse and to provide greater access to services and support for survivors.

“We are ensuring non-government and government organisations are supported to promote child safety, better prevent and respond to child sexual abuse and improve treatment and support for survivors of abuse,” Ms Goward said.

The NSW Government encourages survivors of child sexual or physical assault to access confidential counselling that is available through the Victims Support Scheme on 1800 633 063.

Support can also be reached by calling Lifeline on 13 11 14, Survivors & Mates Support Network Helpline on 1800 472 676 and the Child Protection Helpline on 132 111.

LANDMARK CHILD PROTECTION REFORM TO ENSURE CHILDREN NO LONGER LANGUISH IN CARE

The NSW Government will introduce a landmark child protection Bill into parliament this week to streamline court processes for guardianship and open adoption to ensure a permanent home for every child within two years.

Amendments to the Children and Young Persons (Care and Protection) Act and the Adoption Act will also give parents and extended family members an opportunity to resolve child protection risks and avoid the removal of children from their families.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian said short-term court orders will mean children no longer spend years moving between homes in the out-of-home care system.

“We want all children to know that they have a loving and safe home for life,” Ms Berejiklian said.

“When it is no longer safe for a child to stay at home, we want them to have a permanent home as quickly as possible through guardianship or open adoption. These reforms will help speed up that process.”

The reforms follow a wide-ranging public consultation process led by the discussion paper, Shaping A Better Child Protection System, released in October 2017.

Minister for Family and Community Services Pru Goward said the landmark reforms pave the way for family networks to support parents struggling to care for their children.

“For the first time ever, we will legislate for families to be offered alternatives such as Family Group Conferencing, giving parents and extended family the opportunity to address child protection risks so that their children can stay safely at home,” Ms Goward said.

“We are also looking to make guardianship easier for families with parents that know they can no longer care for their children and want to ensure their children have safety and security with a loving member of their family.”

 

NSW LABOR WILL SLASH RED TAPE FOR FIREFIGHTER COMPENSATION

NSW Labor will slash red tape for firefighters seeking compensation following a cancer diagnosis, to put an end to them having to go to excessive lengths to prove a direct cause of the disease.

Member for Newcastle, Tim Crakanthorp today joined his colleague Member for Charlestown, Jodie Harrison and Fire Brigades Union Sub Branch Secretary, Jason Morgan at Cooks Hill Fire Station to discuss this pressing issue.

NSW is one of the last states to introduce appropriate legislation to eliminate red tape for firefighters seeking compensation following a Commonwealth Bill which was passed in 2011.

The legislation is being strongly supported by the Fire Brigade Employees Union and the Rural Fire Services Association who have been campaigning on the importance of presumptive cancer legislation for firefighters and volunteer firefighters being enacted in NSW.

Numerous studies have conclusively proven that firefighters are at much greater risk of developing certain cancers as a result of being exposed to hazardous substances due to the nature of their job.

A firefighter diagnosed with one or more of the 12 listed cancers would automatically have their disease presumed to be caused by occupational hazards while firefighting, if they meet the minimum service period according to the table below.

The Bill forms part of NSW Labor’s 2019 Emergency Services Plan.

Quotes attributable to Member for Newcastle Tim Crakanthorp

“Firefighters regularly put their lives on the line to protect our communities from harm. It’s our duty to ensure we afford them the appropriate protections in return.”

“This legislation is intended to protect and assist firefighters during the tumultuous times which follow the diagnosis of cancer. NSW Labor is committed to providing our firefighters with the reassurance that they will be looked after. That is why this legislation is vitally important.”

Quotes attributable to Member for Charlestown Jodie Harrison

“It is a fact that exposure to hazardous chemicals causes cancer.”

“This Bill will make it easier for firefighters to access the compensation they deserve if they are diagnosed with cancer.”

“I, along with my Labor colleagues, stand in solidarity with the Fire Brigade Employees Union to fight for peace of mind for our firefighters.”

Decision to withdraw terrorism charges – Operation Moorsel

The NSW Joint Counter Terrorism Team (JCTT) has informed the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions that it supports the withdrawal of the terrorism charge laid on a 25-year-old Sri Lankan citizen (Mr Nizamdeen) on 31 August 2018.

The decision to lay the charge was informed by an investigation of one of Mr Nizamdeen’s notebooks found in a desk he used at the University of NSW.

A subsequent expert forensic examination of the notebook indicated irregularities between examples of Mr Nizamdeen’s handwriting and the handwriting in the notebook that specified terrorist threats.

The JCTT yesterday received definitive advice on the handwriting that has resulted in the action to discontinue the prosecution.

The JCTT investigation has shifted to focus on the possibility that the content of the notebook has been created by other people.

The JCTT acted in good faith on the evidence available at all stages of the investigation. The very nature of terrorism matter often means that police need to intervene earlier than they would in normal criminal matters.

As more evidence was gathered that contradicted the initial material, the JCTT acted appropriately to inform the CDPP and inform the courts.

The investigation into the circumstances of this matter remains ongoing, but there is no information to indicate that there is a current threat to community safety.

The JCTT has committed significant resources to this investigation and is determined to discover those responsible for these criminal actions.

NEW LAWS TO TACKLE OUTLAW BIKIE GANGS

New laws will make it easier for NSW Police to tackle organised crime during raids on outlaw motorcycle gang clubhouses, Premier Gladys Berejiklian, Attorney General Mark Speakman and Police Minister Troy Grant announced today.

“NSW has the toughest organised crime laws in Australia and our Police will now be better equipped than ever to tackle dangerous outlaw bikie gangs,” Ms Berejiklian said.

“The NSW Liberals & Nationals Government will not tolerate criminal behaviour which undermines community safety.”

Under the new laws, Police executing a warrant on outlaw bikie clubhouses will have clear powers to:

  • search anyone on site;
  • compel any person to reveal their name and address; and
  • compel people present at the venue to move on.

Mr Grant said the reforms, which will help police identify suspects, gather evidence and seize dangerous firearms and weapons, are part of the NSW Government’s unrelenting crackdown on organised criminal gang activity.

“There is no room for outlaw bikies in NSW, who will continue to be hounded by Police until they leave the state or find a new, legal hobby,” Mr Grant said.

The legislative amendments, to be introduced into the Parliament in coming weeks, respond to the Ombudsman’s report on the Restricted Premises Act.

The NSW Government has accepted all the Ombudsman’s recommendations which will give Police greater clarity about their powers and responsibilities when raiding outlaw bikie gang clubhouses,” Mr Speakman said.

Police have been using the powers provided under the Restricted Premises Act, which was formerly known as the Disorderly Houses Act, to target outlaw bikie clubhouses for the past decade.

These powers were strengthened in 2013 to enhance the ability of Police to combat firearms-related and organised crime, with a focus on the activities of outlaw bikie gangs.

These powers are on top of a range of other tough measures available to Police to target outlaw bikie crime, including those set out below.

  • Serious Crime Prevention Orders – to impose restrictions on people to disrupt their involvement in serious criminal activity.
  • Public Safety Orders – to prevent people from attending places or events where they are expected to engage in violence or present a serious threat to public safety or security.
  • Consorting laws – which carry a maximum three year prison term for people who continue to associate with convicted offenders after receiving an official warning from Police.
  • Unexplained wealth laws – which place a burden on suspects to prove their income was lawfully acquired.
  • Firearm Prohibition Orders – allowing Police to search, without warrant, premises or vehicles occupied by anyone subjected to the order to ensure compliance.

“Strike Force Raptor has dismantled numerous bikie-led drug and organised crime operations and is continuing to crack down on outlaw bikie violence,” said Police Commissioner Mick Fuller.

In April 2018, NSW Police successfully applied to the Supreme Court for Serious Crime Prevention Orders against 10 high-ranking members of the Finks and Nomads outlaw motorcycle gangs who were linked to gang-related violence across the Lower Hunter region.